LED spectroscopy

I’m working on a project that will include using LEDs as light sensors, and one of the first tasks is to learn a bit more about the wavelengths of light that are emitted by an array of LEDs. Since I’ve recently created a Mathematica interface to an Ocean Optics spectrometer (on a Raspberry Pi, naturally), the first task was pretty straightforward.

Emission spectra of several LEDs. rgb(b,g,r) are in a common cathode RGB led while the others are varieties from Adafruit.
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It’s elemental

I recently purchased a few particles in part because they are little devices that are named after elements that allow you to connect sensors to the internet; what about these items does not scream BoBtheChemist?

I’m currently running through some tutorials and am sure to forget a thing or three, so I’m going to chronicle my experience in hopes to (a) have a central repository for my work, (b) show that my website does have some activity (c) possibly serve as a resource for the 1-2 bots that frequent my website.

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How can molecules move?

My Analytical Chemistry class just started the module on spectroscopy, and I wanted to have a visualization that displayed the different types of motion (rotational, translational and stretching) that molecules can experience. It turned out, I was able to make an interactive (sort of) graphic with a few lines of Mathematica code:

The three general classes of molecular motion.
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Mathematica catches the heat

I recently purchased the AMG8833 thermal camera breakout from Adafruit.  It’s an 8×8 pixel array of sensors that can be used to incorporate thermal vision into a project.  I’m interested in monitoring a thermoelectric cooler.  Adafruit provides a number of examples on how to interface the breakout with a Raspberry Pi or display connected to an Arduino.  I wanted to try a different interface and see if I could control it with Mathematica.  It took me longer to write this post than it did to write the software.

Temperature of 30×30 mm2 Peltier cooling device being measured with an AMG8833.

Read on if you’re interested in learning more

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