My first paper on 3D printing is published

Before leaving Chicago State University in 2017, I took a sabbatical to explore a very different avenue of research from which I was originally trained.  I became interested in learning how digital fabrication tools, such as 3D printing, can be used to create inexpensive or customized scientific instrumentation that could be used for education or specialized research applications.  Now at The College at Brockport, I’ve finally put together my first 3D printed scientific instrument, which was recently published in the journal HardwareX.  The article, OMIS: The Open Millifluidic Inquiry System for small scale chemical synthesis and analysis, is open access, which means that anyone can read and download the article by heading here.

I’d like to think that when people do something important (like publish an article) they get interviewed.  Unfortunately, it’s that time of the semester where students are so stressed out, the last thing they want to do is talk to professors about anything other than “what’s on the test.”  So, if I were to give an interview, here’s the questions I’d answer (and ask) about the paper.

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Predicting elemental properties for #RealTimeChem Week

Happy #RealTimeChem week everybody.  What, you don’t know what it is?  Neither did I, untill I happened to read about it over at Compound Interest . (You guessed it, I’ve got lots of grading to do so I’m procrastinating again.) Since the theme this year centers on the four new elements that have been added to the periodic table, and I have an affinity for the table and all its secrets, I thought it might be fun to take advantage of the periodic properties of the table and predict some of the characteristics of the new elements.

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Trash to treasure in the chem lab

A few years back, I bought a whole bunch of Fisher brand pipette tips and now my lab is cluttered with a bunch of empty plastic boxes now that the tips have been used and disposed of.  I needed a quick project enclosure to build an instrument for a student and thought this might be an interesting exercise in repurposing.

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The chemistry behind the flint water problem

Andy Brunning over at Compound Interest has created a great infographic to help explain some of the chemistry behind the Flint water crisis. The graphic is below, but I strongly encourage you to take a look at his full article

Andy’s post introduces a lot of concepts that could be incorporated into a Chemistry lecture, making it a potentially valuable resource for connecting what students may find as esoteric concepts to real-life situations.  Check out the full article while I jot down some ideas for exam questions….