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Orlando ACS

I presented some of my research at the American Chemical Society meeting in Orlando and thought it would be helpful to have a central repository for some of the items I discussed, so here it is.

  • A copy of the powerpoint slides.
  • A link to my Hardwarex paper, which describes the project I discussed.
  • If you missed the big link in the header of my website, I’ve got an entire page devoted to OMIS (which does need updating).
  • The github page which contains the code for programming the Arduino.
  • Want to get started with Arduino microcontrollers (with the intent to build OMIS)? Start with picking up the Arduino and a stepper motor from Adafruit. Then, follow their tutorial on how to use it.
  • The ACS didn’t allow attendees or speakers(!) to access the internet while at the conference (at least the registration fees didn’t go up … oh wait). Ahem, in any case, I wasn’t able to show this video, which demonstrates that two liquids in a 3D printed channel undergo laminar flow.

How can molecules move?

My Analytical Chemistry class just started the module on spectroscopy, and I wanted to have a visualization that displayed the different types of motion (rotational, translational and stretching) that molecules can experience. It turned out, I was able to make an interactive (sort of) graphic with a few lines of Mathematica code:

The three general classes of molecular motion.
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My first paper on 3D printing is published

Before leaving Chicago State University in 2017, I took a sabbatical to explore a very different avenue of research from which I was originally trained.  I became interested in learning how digital fabrication tools, such as 3D printing, can be used to create inexpensive or customized scientific instrumentation that could be used for education or specialized research applications.  Now at The College at Brockport, I’ve finally put together my first 3D printed scientific instrument, which was recently published in the journal HardwareX.  The article, OMIS: The Open Millifluidic Inquiry System for small scale chemical synthesis and analysis, is open access, which means that anyone can read and download the article by heading here.

I’d like to think that when people do something important (like publish an article) they get interviewed.  Unfortunately, it’s that time of the semester where students are so stressed out, the last thing they want to do is talk to professors about anything other than “what’s on the test.”  So, if I were to give an interview, here’s the questions I’d answer (and ask) about the paper.

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Predicting elemental properties for #RealTimeChem Week

Happy #RealTimeChem week everybody.  What, you don’t know what it is?  Neither did I, untill I happened to read about it over at Compound Interest . (You guessed it, I’ve got lots of grading to do so I’m procrastinating again.) Since the theme this year centers on the four new elements that have been added to the periodic table, and I have an affinity for the table and all its secrets, I thought it might be fun to take advantage of the periodic properties of the table and predict some of the characteristics of the new elements.

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