LED spectroscopy

I’m working on a project that will include using LEDs as light sensors, and one of the first tasks is to learn a bit more about the wavelengths of light that are emitted by an array of LEDs. Since I’ve recently created a Mathematica interface to an Ocean Optics spectrometer (on a Raspberry Pi, naturally), the first task was pretty straightforward.

Emission spectra of several LEDs. rgb(b,g,r) are in a common cathode RGB led while the others are varieties from Adafruit.
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Up up and away

Do you know what a film canister is?  It’s a small plastic container that used to contain film.  Do you know what film is?  If you don’t, chances are you were born after 2003, which is about the time when digital photography overtook film photography.  It’s interesting that the container that was used to store film has actually outlived the film itself; you can buy packs of film canisters on Amazon for about $0.50 a piece.  They are useful for storage, art projects and film canister rockets.

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Orlando ACS

I presented some of my research at the American Chemical Society meeting in Orlando and thought it would be helpful to have a central repository for some of the items I discussed, so here it is.

  • A copy of the powerpoint slides.
  • A link to my Hardwarex paper, which describes the project I discussed.
  • If you missed the big link in the header of my website, I’ve got an entire page devoted to OMIS (which does need updating).
  • The github page which contains the code for programming the Arduino.
  • Want to get started with Arduino microcontrollers (with the intent to build OMIS)? Start with picking up the Arduino and a stepper motor from Adafruit. Then, follow their tutorial on how to use it.
  • The ACS didn’t allow attendees or speakers(!) to access the internet while at the conference (at least the registration fees didn’t go up … oh wait). Ahem, in any case, I wasn’t able to show this video, which demonstrates that two liquids in a 3D printed channel undergo laminar flow.

How can molecules move?

My Analytical Chemistry class just started the module on spectroscopy, and I wanted to have a visualization that displayed the different types of motion (rotational, translational and stretching) that molecules can experience. It turned out, I was able to make an interactive (sort of) graphic with a few lines of Mathematica code:

The three general classes of molecular motion.
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Global Women’s Breakfast @Brockport

DON’T FORGET! Stop by the Smith Lounge (if you happen to be on the Brockport Campus) Tuesday the 12th at 8:30 AM for breakfast and networking. Bring along your friends and be sure to post to your social media sites #GlobalBreakfast #IUPAC100 #ACS.

On February 12th, 2019, we’ll be hosting a Breakfast honoring women in Chemistry. During the breakfast, we’ll have time to talk about the women who have won nobel prizes in Chemistry and – in honor of the 150th anniversary of the periodic table – the women who are credited with discovering elements.

Want to know more about what this event is and why it’s important? See this editorial by Marcy Towns in the Journal of Chemical Education. (I’m not sure if it is behind a paywall.)

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